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Metal Building Insulation Packages

Regulate, Moderate, Insulate - Safeguard Your Metal Building with Proper Insulation

Almost everyone knows that insulation moderates interior temperatures in a steel building. It keeps warm air inside during cold winter months and prevents heat from penetrating your structure in the summer. But for a steel building, it’s even more important. Insulation creates a barrier in the roof system and walls that prevents condensation – more than an annoyance, condensation can compromise the look, lifespan, and stability of your steel building.

In many areas, local building codes require that your steel building be insulated. Buildings without heat or air conditioning can usually pass inspections without insulation, but for just about every other kind of steel building, some kind of insulation is going to be required.

The experienced team at Great Western will help you make the right choice. But consider several things when choosing insulation.

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Choosing the right kind of insulation is important – several factors are involved:

  • Your region’s climate
  • Your skill at application of the insulation
  • The use of the building
  • Of course, budget!

Standard Metal Building Insulation

Standard Steel Building Insulation Packages

The most common is 3-6” (3" on the walls, 6" on the roof) fiberglass compression insulation.

Compression insulation is by far the most used insulation for steel buildings. It comes in thicknesses ranging from 3 to 6 inches and is usually faced with a white vinyl vapor barrier. The quality of the vapor barrier varies, WMP-VR/VRR is the most affordable and most common in the industry. At Great Western we supply WMP-50 as a standard, this vapor barrier allows less moisture transfer than the VR/R product. Ask your Great Western representative for product specifics.

This insulation system is called a compression system because it is sandwiched between the roof or wall panel and the secondary structural system (girts or purlins). The insulation is placed with the vapor barrier towards the inside of the structure and the bare fiberglass pressed against the panel.

Fiberglass Insulation Pros and Cons

Pros
  • Affordability
  • Ease of Installation
  • Excellent Moisture Control
  • Adds Aesthetic Appeal
  • Brightens Interior of Building
Cons
  • 6” Thickness Can Cause Oil-Canning Effect
  • R-Value Loss in Compressed Areas
  • Will Not Pass All Energy Codes
  • Max R-Value of R-19

Fiberglass Compression Insulation Specs

Fiberglass Manufacturer: Owens Corning
Facing/Vapor Barrier Manufacturer: Lamtec
Facing Type: WMP-VR or WMP-50 (Standard)
Thickness: 3 – 6” Faced
R-Value: R-10 – R-19
Facing Reinforcing: Tri-Directional Polyester
Facing Film: Metallized Polyester/Polypropylene
Light Reflectance: 85% (White)

Vinyl Sag & Bag Insulation Systems

Sag and Bag Insulation Specs

Fiberglass Manufacturer: Owens Corning
Facing/Vapor Barrier Manufacturer: Lamtec
Facing Type: WMP-VR or WMP-50 (Standard)
Thickness: 3 – 6” Faced
R-Value: R-10 – R-19
Facing Reinforcing: Tri-Directional Polyester
Facing Film: Metallized Polyester/Polypropylene
Light Reflectance: 85% (White)

Sag and Bag Metal Building Insulation Systems

Sag and Bag insulation systems are dual layer insulation systems. Typically only found on roof systems they are very similar to the standard compression system.

Sag and Bag uses standard 3-6” compression insulation that sags between the roof purlins. An extra layer of non-faced fiberglass in any thickness is rolled parallel to the purlins within the ‘sag.’ The thicker the ‘bag’ the more sag will be required. With Liner Systems becoming more and more affordable, sag and bag is not as popular as it used to be.

Vapor Barrier Pros and Cons

Pros
  • Higher R Values
  • Affordability
  • Passes Most Energy Codes
Cons
  • Difficult Installation
  • R-Value Loss at Roof Purlin
  • Provides Zero Fall Protection
  • Erectors Prefer Other Insulation Systems

Interior Liner Insulation Systems

Liner Systems

A powerful insulation system growing in popularity.

Fiberglass liner systems are becoming more and more popular with building authorities, the International Code Council, Erectors and building owners alike. Liner systems are at the cutting edge of Metal Building Insulation Systems. Capable of meeting OSHA standards for both active and passive fall protection and some of the highest R-Values available for steel building systems.

A continuous liner is installed on the underside of the roof purlin or the inside flange of the girt. For roof systems, a steel banding which provides the fall protection is used to hold the liner up, a similar system is used for the walls. The Cavity of the girt or purlin is then filled with pre-cut fiberglass and a top layer of fiberglass is rolled over the top of the purlin or girt to provide a thermal block and additional R-Value. Roof Panels are then installed over the insulation.

Fiberglass Liner Insulation Pros and Cons

Pros
  • R-Values up To R-50
  • Easily Meets All US Energy Codes
  • Fall Protection = Safety for Your Workers
  • Beautiful Finished Look
  • Less Expensive than Insulated Panels
  • Custom Fabricated For Each Building
Cons
  • Less Affordable than Other Fiberglass Insulation Systems
  • Adds to Engineering and Fabrication Time

Liner Insulation Specs

Fiberglass Manufacturer: Owens Corning
Liner Manufacturer: Bay Insulation
Facing Type: Banded Fabric .02 perm factor
Thickness: Up to 12”
R-Value: Up to R-49
U-Factor: .037 to .029 W/ SS Roof and Thermal Blocks
Facing Reinforcing: Tri-Directional Polyester and Steel Banding
Facing Film: Polyethylene
Light Reflectance: 85% (White)

Misc. Options And FAQ's

Vapor Barrier Only System

Low R Value Moisture Protection

For buildings that are not going to be climate controlled in any significant way but still need to deal with moisture and condensation we offer a felt backing to our standard roof and wall panels. This felt acts as a thermal block and reduces heat transfer from the panel to the structural framing.

NEED AN ADDITIONAL 257 CHARACTERS

Vapor Barrier Pros and Cons

Pros
  • Excellent Moisture Control
  • Easy Installation
  • Affordable
  • Looks Great
  • Washable
Cons
  • No R-Value
  • No Noise Reduction From Wind or Rain

Insulated Steel Panels

Insulated panels are perhaps the easiest to insulation package to install.

They're also the most energy efficient and the most expensive. Available in ribbed, stucco and flat exterior finishes, insulated panels are preferred by many builders and architects.

This system is incredibly simple, providing an interior liner panel, up to 8” of polyurethane foam insulation and the exterior panel in a single unit. Insulated panels are typically a tongue and groove configuration that conceals all fasteners. These panels can be purchased through Great Western or you can send us the panel specifications if you have a vendor you prefer.

Insulated Metal Panels Pros and Cons

Pros
  • Fast and Simple Installation
  • Fire Ratings Available
  • Numerous Finishes and Profiles Available
  • Meets All US Energy Codes
Cons
  • High Monetary Investment
  • Shipping Requirements

Steel Building Insulation FAQ's

  • Where Should I Insulate?

    • Where you're going to lose the most heat.

      The majority of heat transfer is through the roof system – so insulating the roof is critical, at the very least. Almost every region in the US has at least some snowfall- and if not snow, its humidity, heavy rains, or dramatic heat/cold fluctuations. While not as much heat transfers through the wall systems it is important to insulate the entire structure. This insulation will prevent costly condensation which may result in rust.

  • How Much Insulation Do I Need?

    • That depends on a number of factors.

      The most common type of insulation is roll insulation and it varies in thickness from 3 inches to a full foot in thickness. Great Western recommends that every building is insulated with at least 3 inches of insulation at the minimum. If you have a HVAC system or you’re planning on steady occupancy of the building and want to make the occupants comfortable and save on heating and cooling costs, it’s best to invest in thicker insulation at the beginning. This will save you thousands of dollars down the road.

      The Great Western team can help you calculate how much insulation you’re going to need. We will also help you determine the best type of insulation system for your project as well.

  • Will You Help Me Determine My Insulation Needs?

    • Absolutely. We're experts on all facets of metal building construction, insulation included.

      Our sales and account management teams are comprised of some of the industries most knowledgeable steel building experts. The average industry experience in our customer facing departments is 7.5 years. Everyone here has the experience and knowledge necessary to help you make the right decisions.

  • Will You Guide Me Through the Installation Process?

    • Of Course! Our Team Has Hands On Experience With Insulation Installs.

      When you team up with Great Western, you've got some the industries greatest minds in your corner. Leverage our decades of combined experience to your advantage. We'll walk you through every step of the process - from conception to completion.

  • How Much is My Insulation Package Going to Cost Me?

    • That depends on the package you choose.

      Unfortunately, it's very difficult to shoot from the hip on insulation prices. There are many factors that play into your total package cost. How tall is your building? How thick is the insulation on the walls? The Roof? How steep is your roof pitch? That said, you should expect to pay no less than $1.00/SF.

  • Does Great Western Manufacture Insulation?

    • No we do not.

      Great Western maintains relationships with vendors across the US to help you get the best price. When you purchase your insulation through GWS, you're leveraging our relationships and buying power, ensuring you get the best deal possible.

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